Ming Thein on the evolution of street photography

Posted on by Mike Evans

Words of wisdom from Ming:

It is worth remembering that an image reflects the photographer as much as it is about the subject. Think of these images from a social commentary standpoint: what does it say that what the masses consider ‘good’ street photography involves: aggressive invasions of personal space, fascination with the homeless and disadvantaged, capturing people in unflattering poses at non-representative instants (often wrongly interpreted as ‘the decisive moment’) and generally sloppy shot discipline (tilts, focus misses, unintentional motion blur, clipped exposures, etc.). There is also an obsession with black and white only; not just that, but black and white with only two tonal values: black, and white. And don’t get me started on those images that have no obvious subject other than a road. All I can add to this is one should really look at the work of those handing out the evaluations: it’s not easy to put forth an objective criticism of something without allowing personal biases to enter.

∞ Permalink

Leica Tri-Elmar: Return of the classic from the 6-bit man

Posted on by Mike Evans

Following my purchase of the classic MATE (the later 46mm-thread version) from David Stephens of the Leica Store Manchester at the Photographica camera fair in May, I quickly decided that the lack of six-bit coding was a major handicap. To be certain of best results it was necessary to enter the menu and change the lens focal length before switching from 28 to 35 or 50mm. I'm so used to dealing with modern six-bit lenses that this was all too much. Something had to be done. 

Read More
∞ Permalink