iPhone 4S: Choosing the right model for you

Posted on by Mike Evans

After considerable indecision and chest-beating, I finally opted for the mid-range, 32GB iPhone 4S. Apart from the fact that I rather resent paying over $1,000 for a mere phone, the 32GB is probably the one that most buyers will go for. There is an argument for the 64GB millionaire model if you intend to use that new 8 megapixel camera to the full and don’t transfer your movies and photographs to the Mac on a regular basis. Or if you have a massive music collection and must have every track with you at all times. But in the real world, certainly in my world, you can live with 32GB.

On my 32GB iPhone 4 I have consistently brushed the 16GB barrier and I know from experience that the cheapest iPhone 4S wouldn’t suit me. Equally, I don’t think my usage will differ dramatically and so I cannot justify the top model. I’m aware that iCloud could result in more data storage, but I still think I have sufficient wriggle room in 32GB.

There is another factor to consider. The 4S is the mid-cycle facelift for the current body. Probably within twelve months, more likely ten, we will see that radically different iPhone 5 that many expected this week. It’s inevitable, so I know my new 4S will be with me for a relatively short time. To shell out for the 64GB would hurt when it comes to upgrade time.

You can get by with a smaller memory if you take a few simple precautions such as:

  • Treat your phone like a camera’s SD card and transfer your photographs to your Mac regularly. Just keep a few favourite photographs in the phone’s memory.
  • Synchronise iTunes playlists rather than your whole music collection. Better still, subscribe to Spotify and change your playlists frequently to suit your mood.
  • Watch movies on your iPad
  • Don’t install TomTom or similar navigator apps because they take up lots of space. It’s cheaper to buy a stand-alone TomTom for your car.

That said, I don’t think 32GB is a compromise. It’s the sweet point for the 4S. 

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