Top Ten posts on Macfilos this week: Which is the best street camera?

by Mike Evans

During the past week Fuji posts have dominated readership on Macfilos with Bill Palmer's gaze into the future of the X-Pro vying with a couple of articles on choosing the best street camera. Older reviews of three Leica cameras, the C, the X-Vario and the M-P continue to bring in the visitors, although reader interest in the Leica T remains low. The new f/2.4 Summarits, which have not yet hit the dealers, are clearly exciting lots of attention and are likely to be good sellers for the German brand. 

1. Fuji X-T1: Better street camera than the X100?
2. Fuji X-Pro 2: Bill Palmer looks into his crystal ball 
3. Fuji Street Cam: X-T1 v X100T and X-E2
4. Leica lenses on Sony A7 models 
5. Leica lenses on Fuji X-E1
6. Fuji X-Series firmware update
7. Leica X-Vario camera review
8. Leica C camera review
9. Leica Summart f/2.4 range: First Impressions
10. Leica M-P camera review

Nikon Coolpix A camera in best Christmas deal

by Mike Evans

Steve Huff says:

The fabulous Nikon Coolpix A, the pocket APS-C IQ monster that sold for $1100 since launch has now sunken to an amazing LOW price for the Silver model (which looks really sharp in person). Do not pay $1099, nope! B&H Photo is blowing out the silver Coolpix A for $399. THIS my friends is the best deal of the year I think.

My question is why? I have not had the chance to play with the Nikon Coolpix A (I have "seen it in person" and even fondled it, however) but, if it is as fabulous as Steve maintains, why is the price dropping like a stone? Like the Canon EOS M, the Coolpix A is a johnny-come-lately mirrorless offering that has not been a monumental success. When this happens prices drop. There is no doubt that both cameras can now be described as bargains, but is this the only reason to buy them?

There are four good reasons not to buy the Nikon or the Canon: They are Olympus, Panasonic, Fuji and Sony.

Craig Semetko: Using the Leica M Rangefinder

by Mike Evans

My thanks to LeicaRumors for bringing this short video to my attention and it is well worth a moment of your time. Craig Semetko explains the genius of the rangefinder system that has not changed materially since 1954. Anyone handling the first M3 in that year would be familiar with today's M and, above all, the rangefinder would work in exactly the same way. 

Leica T Firmware: Update brings performance improvements, better manual focus aid

by Mike Evans

Leica has announced version 1.3 firmware for the T series cameras. Improvements include fixes for two of the problems I mentioned when I reviewed the camera in August: Startup time, which  was sluggish, has been speeded and there is a redesign to the annoying implementation of the focus aid function. Instead of requiring a screen touch to move between x3 and x6 magnification, the new firmware enables all settings to be performed directly by means of the left soft dial. 

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Fuji X-Series firmware update brings big improvements, especially for X-T1

by Mike Evans

Today, as scheduled, Fuji has released the firmware updates for X-Series interchangeable-lens cameras. In the case of the X-E2 and X-T1 the improvements are significant, especially so with the X-T1 which now gets a high-speed electronic shutter with a maximum speed of 1/32000s. By comparison, the mechical shutter tops out at 1/4000s and this can often be too slow to take full advantage of faster lenses such as the f/1.2 56mm Fujinon in bright conditions.

Among the other goodies (there are 27 items altogether) doled out to X-T1 owners include a Classic Chrome film simulation mode, natural live view, AF+MF hybrid focusing, direct selection of macro, Q-menu customisation, new video frame rates, and tethering support

Read more and link to the download pages

Finger my Noctiluxes at your peril, snaps Red Dot's Elvis

by Mike Evans

The team at Red Dot Cameras in Old Street will be leaving the premises in good claws over the holidays: Elvis, equipped with special Amazon infra-red sensors for immediate snapping, is on the prowl. So anyone who likes a Leica for Christmas had better get in there before close of play on the 20th or they could have Elvis to contend with. 

Leica Monochrom Silver Engrave special edition

by Mike Evans

Those of you into Leica special editions will drool over the latest creation from Wetzlar, the Monochrom Silver Engrave. It is distinguished by the Leica engraving on the top plate, similar to that on the M-P. The bad news is that it will be available only in Japan and will be limited to just 30 cameras. We'll just have to slum it with an M60 edition.

Read the story on Leica Rumors 

Eric Kim and the tyranny of choice

by Mike Evans

Street photographer Eric Kim is a well-known advocate of a one-camera lifestyle. He has given away many cameras to friends in his quest. For most purposes, he relies on his film Leica MP and a solitary M lens, the 35mm Summicron.  Yet he still has a couple of standby cameras, one film and one digital.

Read the full story here

Leica M9 Sensors: Injection of new life into used camera market

by Mike Evans

Last week Leica did the right thing by taking full responsibility for the corrosion issue affecting all M9-series cameras, including the M-E and Monochrom. As a result, in just a few days, new life has been injected into the used camera market. It's no secret than in the two months leading up to last week's announcement, used M9s had been gathering dust on dealers' shelves. Confidence had deserted the market and, of course, word soon spreads around the Leica world. 

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Leica M9 Sensor Problem: Free replacements, irrespective of age

by Mike Evans

After weeks of indecision and half measures, Leica AG has finally bitten the bullet and done what should have been done in the first place. All CCD sensors in M9-series cameras which exhibit signs of corrosion will be replaced without charge. This "goodwill arrangement" is also extended to cover the replacement sensors. Furthermore, anyone who has been charged for the repair will have their money refunded.

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